Flower Feature: Tulips


Tulip, 2005 Floriade, Canberra

Image via Wikipedia

Tulips came in my garden this year red and as lovely as ever. I
wanted to cut them and put them in a vase but I just couldn’t. They
were the only early blooming flowers I had this year and they made it all to nice
to step in my back yard and see color.

Tulips are spring-blooming perennials that grow from bulbs.
Depending on the species, tulip plants can grow as short as 4 inches or as high as 28 inches. The tulip’s larger flowers usually bloom on scapes or subscaposestems that lack bracts. Most tulips produce only one flower per stem, but a few species bear multiple flowers on their scapes. The showy, generally cup or star-shaped tulip flower has three petals and three sepals, which are often termed tepals because they are nearly identical. These six tepals are often marked
near the bases with darker colorings. Tulip flowers come in a wide
variety of colors, except pure blue (several tulips with “blue” in the
name has a faint violet hue).

Read more: Wiki Tulip

Fascinating facts about Tulips

  • Tulips belong to the same family
  • The word “tulip” is descended from a Persian word “dulband” — which led to a Turkish word “tülbent (turban, like the hat) — which led to the Latin “tulipa”.
  • The most popular tulips are the red varieties. The most famous tulip is said to be “Queen of the Night” — a tulip that is almost black (it’s actually a very deep purple).
  • Tulips should be planted in the fall.
  • Tulip bulbs can be “forced” into blooming by storing them in a cold place for 12-16 weeks — even the refrigerator.
  • There are a bunch of recipes that use tulip petals: as cups for mousse, accents for tuna, for salad dressing, and little dishes for appetizers. There’s even a recipe for tulip wine, which is apparently “a lovely white”.

Read more: All Over Albany

So as you may now you can cook with Tulips. How interesting. Below is a recipe.

Tulip recipe

Ingredients

    • 1 1/4 pound(s) thin fresh asparagus
    • 2 large pesticide-free red or other color tulips, rinsed and drained
    • 1 tablespoon(s) vegetable oil
    • 3 tablespoon(s) water
    • 2 teaspoon(s) finely grated lemon rind
    • 1 teaspoon(s) butter
    • 1/4 teaspoon(s) salt
    • 1/8 teaspoon(s) ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Cut or break off woody ends of
    asparagus and discard. With vegetable peeler, peel lower half of each
    asparagus spear. Pull petals off tulip stems; cut and discard 1/4 inch
    from bitter base of each petal where it was attached to stem. Slice
    tulip petals across into 1/4-inch-wide julienne strips; set aside.
  2. In large skillet, heat oil
    over medium heat. Add asparagus and sauté 2 minutes. Add water; cover
    and cook until water evaporates and asparagus spears are crisp-tender —
    about 5 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon lemon rind, butter, salt, and pepper,
    and sauté 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in half of tulip petals.
  3. Transfer asparagus to serving
    plate; sprinkle with remaining tulip petals and remaining 1 teaspoon
    lemon rind. Serve immediately.
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