Category Archives: Gardening and me

Gardening sites I like: plant on a string and tree shapers


Do you like to stumble upon new and interesting websites? Well I do and gardening websites are some of the best. All that delicious vegetation.

I came stumbled across one gardening site giving instructions on how to grow a garden on a string. What a differently great idea. A ball of dirt hanging from a string growing a plant. It’s minimalistic, clever and just plain cool.

Read more about it: diy project: “kokedama” string garden

Now there is one website I came across some years ago and it just fascinated me. These two people have dedicated their time to shaping trees. They shape and twist trees that grow and live in the ground. Making them into chairs, tables, art. It’s incredible what they have done. It’s just great to look at.

Check it out: Pootre Tree Shapers

 

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Flower Feature: Tulips


Tulip, 2005 Floriade, Canberra

Image via Wikipedia

Tulips came in my garden this year red and as lovely as ever. I
wanted to cut them and put them in a vase but I just couldn’t. They
were the only early blooming flowers I had this year and they made it all to nice
to step in my back yard and see color.

Tulips are spring-blooming perennials that grow from bulbs.
Depending on the species, tulip plants can grow as short as 4 inches or as high as 28 inches. The tulip’s larger flowers usually bloom on scapes or subscaposestems that lack bracts. Most tulips produce only one flower per stem, but a few species bear multiple flowers on their scapes. The showy, generally cup or star-shaped tulip flower has three petals and three sepals, which are often termed tepals because they are nearly identical. These six tepals are often marked
near the bases with darker colorings. Tulip flowers come in a wide
variety of colors, except pure blue (several tulips with “blue” in the
name has a faint violet hue).

Read more: Wiki Tulip

Fascinating facts about Tulips

  • Tulips belong to the same family
  • The word “tulip” is descended from a Persian word “dulband” — which led to a Turkish word “tülbent (turban, like the hat) — which led to the Latin “tulipa”.
  • The most popular tulips are the red varieties. The most famous tulip is said to be “Queen of the Night” — a tulip that is almost black (it’s actually a very deep purple).
  • Tulips should be planted in the fall.
  • Tulip bulbs can be “forced” into blooming by storing them in a cold place for 12-16 weeks — even the refrigerator.
  • There are a bunch of recipes that use tulip petals: as cups for mousse, accents for tuna, for salad dressing, and little dishes for appetizers. There’s even a recipe for tulip wine, which is apparently “a lovely white”.

Read more: All Over Albany

So as you may now you can cook with Tulips. How interesting. Below is a recipe.

Tulip recipe

Ingredients

    • 1 1/4 pound(s) thin fresh asparagus
    • 2 large pesticide-free red or other color tulips, rinsed and drained
    • 1 tablespoon(s) vegetable oil
    • 3 tablespoon(s) water
    • 2 teaspoon(s) finely grated lemon rind
    • 1 teaspoon(s) butter
    • 1/4 teaspoon(s) salt
    • 1/8 teaspoon(s) ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Cut or break off woody ends of
    asparagus and discard. With vegetable peeler, peel lower half of each
    asparagus spear. Pull petals off tulip stems; cut and discard 1/4 inch
    from bitter base of each petal where it was attached to stem. Slice
    tulip petals across into 1/4-inch-wide julienne strips; set aside.
  2. In large skillet, heat oil
    over medium heat. Add asparagus and sauté 2 minutes. Add water; cover
    and cook until water evaporates and asparagus spears are crisp-tender —
    about 5 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon lemon rind, butter, salt, and pepper,
    and sauté 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in half of tulip petals.
  3. Transfer asparagus to serving
    plate; sprinkle with remaining tulip petals and remaining 1 teaspoon
    lemon rind. Serve immediately.

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My gardening book arsenal


Cover of "Western Garden Book of Edibles:...

Cover via Amazon

I have a small but adequate library of gardening books. For awhile, I only had one or two gardening books to work with. I would then substitute my lack of bookage with; gardening apps, the library, free gardening books from my book reader, and internet resources.

Recently I came upon a jackpot of books at my local library. They were having a book sale. I was able to purchase  a mountain of books 3ft high for about $20. In that mound I was able to purchase some gardening books and added them to my lac luster garden book supply.Most of the book were out of date a few years. To me gardening can never really be out of date. The same techniques that were used for gardening 30 years ago can be applied to gardening now.

As we all know books can be very expensive. And in my life I have bought my share of books and I still do. But gardening books especially the real good ones can be expensive. So I have had to get creative with the ways I get my information. Of course we have the internet. And there is no lack of what you can find here.

One of my favorite places to get a garden book for free is barns and noble. They have tons of free nook books. Most of there free books are older but when it comes to gardening that is sometimes the best. Older techniques give you a better understanding of the hard work that goes into the trade, hobby or money saving venture. It also helps you to really hone your skills.

Now days we have quick solutions, diease free seeds, quick fix chemicals, bags of manure, gardening tools and machines, etc. The things we take for granted now are the things people back in the day did not have the luxury to have. Some details that old gardening books have newer books may pass up because of new inventions, products, and seed purchasing abilities. All in all old or new have gardening books is a must have.

I have two main books I use now which are; Western Garden Book of Edibles (purchased at Costco for $14.99) and Reader’s Digest Illustrated Guide to Gardening (purchased at library 1978 edition). These two books are my go to books for all my vegetable and gardening needs. What one doesn’t have the other one does.

I have to say I’ve lost a couple books in rain. I just want to shout out to those books, as they helped me to grow on a larger scale. You will be missed.

My book collection now consist of:

Reader’s Digest Illustrated Guide to Gardening (© 1978, library purchase)

Western Garden Book of Edibles (©t 2010, Costco purchase)

Burpee, Starting Seeds Indoors booklet (Lowe purchase)

Patrick Taylor, Gardening with Bulbs (© 1996, library purchase)

Growing Orchids at your window (© 1972, library purchase)

Color handbook of Garden Insects (© 1979, library purchase)

Breeding New Plants and Flowers (© 2002, library purchase)

Sunset, Annuals (© 1992, library purchase)

Sunset, Perennials (© 2000, library purchase)

Free Nook ebooks : (Most are very old editions, but I just download all I can and delete as I see fit)

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